Tag: parkinson’s

Physical Therapy for Parkinson’s Patients

Senior care for those with Parkinson’s disease can be a challenging endeavor and should not be taken lightly. Parkinson’s is a condition that affects the body’s ability to move in an efficient manner. Parkinson’s disease causes the individual’s dopamine-producing brain cells to die off. Some senior care providers such as Home Care Seattle, home care assistance of Seattle, offer specialized care for seniors suffering from Parkinsons. Because dopamine is the chemical that dictates when and how the body should move, when such cells die a person typically experiences slow movement, instability, and speech problems. Home care is an option for most individuals suffering from the condition, although in severe cases, long-term care may become necessary. One way to assist seniors suffering from Parkinsons is to hire a home care agency. Physical therapy for Parkinson’s patients may include strengthening exercises and exercises to improve balance.

Strengthening Exercises

Many Senior Care Seattle providers believe that Part of proper elder care for Parkinson’s patients is working with a professional therapist who can help the individual to build up his or her strength and prevent or limit future physical impairment. Since Parkinson’s patients lack the chemical that stimulates muscle movement, strengthening exercises are a great way to ensure the person’s muscles do not waste away. The set of exercises prescribed by the physical therapist will vary from patient to patient based on the severity of each patient’s condition, as well as the quality of his or her overall health.

Improving Balance

Physical therapy is often designed to help one maintain his or her balance and coordination, as these are two functions that deteriorate when one has Parkinson’s. The physical therapist will teach the patient and his or her care givers which exercises will help the patient maintain his or her flexibility and ability to walk independently. Find out more about elder care Seattle. Often, such exercises focus on maintaining good basic posture, which will help the patient to walk without stumbling or experiencing a loss of balance.

Additional Considerations

Although those providing in home care for a Parkinson’s patient must be aware that regardless of the amount of time the patient spends in physical therapy, falling due to loss of coordination is always a risk. Need a professional and committed Caregiver Seattle ? Call Seattle Home Care Assistance today. For this reason, it is wise to maintain a safe environment in the home, and keep it free from clutter or objects over which one could easily fall, such as throw rugs or shoes that are kept on the floor rather than in a closet. Parkinson’s patients should work with a physical therapist beginning when they are diagnosed, and continuing as the disease progresses, to ensure that the best quality of life possible is achieved.

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Parkinson’s Disease Diagnosis and Treatment

Characterized as a movement disorder, Parkinson’s disease often is accompanied by muscle stiffness, a slowing or loss of physical movement, tremor, etc. In addition, Parkinson’s disease may carry symptoms that include mood swings (i.e., depression, anxiety, panic attacks, apathy, etc.), changes in behavior, sensations (i.e., arms, legs, hands, etc.) and the ability to process thoughts. Because each case of Parkinson’s disease is unique to the individual it affects, the symptoms may vary from one person to another.

There are several treatment options available to patients who suffer from Parkinson’s disease, including medication that may help to ease the symptoms, surgical procedures, a customized diet consisting of nutrition and exercise. Clinical research indicates that nutrients may help to treat Parkinson’s disease and may even help to slow it’s deteriorating effects. Certain types of physical activities, including yoga and dance are believed to be beneficial in helping to maintain mobility and may ease the discomfort associated with muscle stiffness caused by Parkinson’s disease.

Certain types of medication, including those prescribed for treatment of Parkinson’s disease, carry a risk of dangerous side effects. Therefore, it is important for patients to discuss any possible side effects with their physician prior to taking any medication. It is equally important that physicians be made aware of any past or current medical condition from which the patient suffers and/or any medications that they are currently using. At times, one medication can have a negative reaction with another, which is why it is very important that the patient disclose their medical history to the doctor who is treating them for Parkinson’s disease.

To this day, research continues in the fight to find a cure for Parkinson’s disease. Fundraisers and donations are all a part of what makes medical research possible and what many hope will eventually lead to a cure for this life-altering illness. While Parkinson’s disease may result in the patient becoming more apt to developing other medical conditions, the most common cause of death in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease is believed to be that of pneumonia.

The information in this article is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be considered as, or used in place of, medical advice or professional recommendations for the cause, diagnosis or treatment of Parkinson’s disease. If necessary, individuals should consult a medical doctor for information regarding the likelihood of developing Parkinson’s disease, a proper diagnosis and/or course of treatment.

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Battling Parkinson’s Disease with glutathione

Parkinson’s disease is a brain-wasting disease. It is most common in the elderly, where most cases are found in those above 50. Parkinson’s Disease (or PD) patients suffer from shaking, stiffness, constipation, slowness of movement, drooling, decline in skills we usually take for granted-hand movements and speech for example. Later on, one’s moods and behavior can change, even one’s thinking. It is a hurtful disease, both for patients and their loved ones.

The commonly agreed-on reason for these symptoms is the death of brain cells (neurons) that carry dopamine in the middle part of the brain called substantia nigra, from causes unknown. This dramatically reduces the levels of dopamine in the brain.

It has been observed that a healthy diet has been somewhat effective in alleviating PD symptoms, but most treatments to counter the early symptoms of PD are by taking in dopamine-enhancing drugs like levodopa.

The problem with levodopa is that there are a lot of undesirable side effects listed when taking it – low blood pressure, dizziness and vomiting, stomach bleeding, hair loss, confusion, mood swings, sleeplessness, vivid dreams and hallucinations, drowsiness (which might lead to sleeping even while driving), too much sexual desire – among others.

And there comes a point that these drugs stop working, and cause uncontrolled squirming movements.

But there is a promising alternative to levodopa: therapy.

Along with dopamine, the levels of the body’s -master antioxidant’, glutathione are also dramatically reduced in patients with PD. This increases cell damage inflicted by free radicals. These free radicals roam freely in the brain, damaging brain cells, when glutathione levels are low. Glutathione functions as antioxidant, protector of the immune system, and antitoxin throughout the body

The objective is to raise the body’s glutathione to healthy levels to neutralize free radicals and toxins. Brain damage has been seen to be slowed and stopped – even reversed in some cases when this happens.

But, unlike taking in drugs for dopamine, one cannot just take drugs containing glutathione. Glutathione It is easily destroyed by the stomach. A better oral alternative is to take in glutathione precursors – especially bonded cysteine, which hard to come by and expensive.

At any rate, injecting glutathione, rather than eating cysteine has proven to be more efficient in treating the symptoms of PD. Current glutathione therapy for PD involves intravenous solutions of glutathione for 30 minutes. Most patients experience an improvement in their balance, movements, and mood afterwards. When done regularly, many PD patients recover even their driving skills. Now that’s something to dance about.

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